Lessons - HOLIDAY

 

 

Lesson Overview

Grade K

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

NOTE: December is a crazy month for most music teachers. The December lesson plans are holiday season specific. These ideas can be used as stand-alone lessons and/or program ideas.


Lesson Plan

Grade K


Room Set-up/Environment:
Half circle of chairs, open space for movement in the middle.

Materials Needed:

  1. Freddie the Frog teacher’s puppet
  2. Words displayed: accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, presto
  3. Stair-step xylophone if available
  4. Visual display: horse-drawn sleigh
  5. Two-tone wood blocks or single-tone wood blocks
  6. Pitched barred instruments: Xylophones, glockenspiels, etc.
  7. Visual display: form for “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson
  8. Bass Clef Monster and Treble Clef flashcards: Thump in the Night and Secret of Crater Island sets

Student “I can” statements:

  1. I can find my assigned place in the music classroom.
  2. I can identify and move to the beat of varying tempos and meter.
  3. I can identify, play, chant, and sing on beats one and three.
  4. I can sing music expressively, with varying tempo and dynamics.
  5. I can identify accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, and presto; crescendo
  6. I can identify, sing, and play step-wise and repeating patterns.
  7. I can play an ostinato.
  8. I can count to twelve.
  9. I can identify twelve treble clef note names (B below middle C up through line F) and nine bass clef notes.
  10. I can identify and understand the basic functions of a piano.

Process:

Step 1. Silently point, asking students to find their assigned place to sing Freddie’s song in a two-part round.

Step 2. Wait for students to “do their job” so they can sing to Freddie the Frog.

Transition: Tempo game to introduce accelerando. (See December Video 1 for 1st Grade.)

  • Say, “Accelerando!”
  • Followed by saying, “largo”; then, “andante”; then, “allegro”; then, “presto.”
  • Allow time for students to move to each tempo before saying the next one.
  • Say, “Fine!” (Students stop.)
  • Explain that they just did an “accelerando” and what it means.
  • Ask the students what order it needs to be in to move to an accelerando.
  • Repeat the movement to accelerando.
  • “Andante to your seat.”

Step 3. “Welcome, Friends” (traditional round)

(See December Video 1 to hear the song and watch the demonstration.)

    • Demonstrate on stair-step xylophone or other pitched barred instrument.
    • Play a quarter note ostinato on C while teaching the first line of the song.
    • Play the melody on the second line of the song.
    • Teach one line at a time by rote; echo singing.
    • Require tuneful singing by asking students to listen, think, and then sing. Repeat until they do all three, then move on to the next line.

 

  • Welcome, Friends (meter in 3; 6/8 time signature)Verse 1:s          m           s              d1  t      l         sWelcome, Friends. Be of good cheer.d      r    m    m     f      s     s         l     t     d

    This is the hap-pi-est time of the year.

    Verse 2:

    s      m    s       d1    t     l       s

     One for all,   all—   for   one.

    d        r    m    m      f         s         s      l     t     d

     Sing all to- ge-ther, come join in the fun.

    • Add C boomwhackers, or other pitched instrument, to play a quarter note ostinato on C.
    • Add melody on bells or pitched barred instruments.
    • Ask students to identify the melodic pattern played. (1 2 3 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 or d r m m f s s l t d )
    • If time allows, give students an opportunity to play the ostinato and the melody, or save for a future lesson.

    Transition: Ask students to return instruments as directed.

    Step 4. “Jingle Bells”

      • Show students a visual of a horse-drawn sleigh. Preferably an image from the late 1800″s when horse-drawn sleighs were used for transportation. Briefly ask questions about why the students think this type of transportation was used.
      • Discuss that automobiles were not invented yet.
      • The purpose and meaning of “bobtails.” (Braided and wrapped in a bun to keep the ice and snow from getting in the horse’s tail.)
      • The purpose of bells on horse’s strapping. (Sleighs on snow are quiet. The jingling of the bells warned pedestrians and others of their arrival.)

    Teach the verse to “Jingle Bells,”” pointing to the corresponding parts in the visual, such as “one-horse open sleigh,” and “bells on bobtails.”

    Jingle Bells

    Verse:

    Dashing through the snow
    In a one-horse open sleigh.
    Over the fields we go
    Laughing all the way.
    Bells on bobtails ring
    Making spirits bright.
    What fun it is to ride and sing
    Our sleighing song tonight.
    Oh…

    Chorus:
    Jingle bells, jingle bells.
    Jingle all the way.
    Oh, what fun it is ride
    In a one-horse open sleigh.
    Hey! (Repeat chorus.)

    • Direct students to keep the beat with body percussion or jingle bells as they sing.

    Transition: Return instruments to assigned locations.
    Draw or display boxes (representing measures).
    Ask students to chant, then count. (See December Video 1, 1st Grade.)

    Step 5. “In the Toy Shop” (traditional)

    NOTE: Kids LOVE this! Also works well as a performance piece.
    (Simple costume performance note: Add ribbon suspenders attached to boys clothing with safety pins: tutus made out of netting with ribbon to tie it around the waist.)

    There are several variations. The simplest is to have the students stand still at their assigned places, as though they are toys in a toy shop–boys pre-tend to be wooden soldiers; girls, cuckoo clocks (the “clocks” stand on their chairs, if feasible and safe). In a room with window light, turn off the lights to emulate a toy shop in the middle of the night.

    Set the song up with a story. I’m the toy shop owner who is very tired. It is in the middle of the holiday season and I have worked long hours. I walk over to the light switch to turnoff the lights and go home. BUT, what the toy shop owner does not know, is that at the stroke of midnight the toys come to life for one hour.

      • Direct the girls to stand on their chairs as though they are the cuckoo clocks hanging on the walls of the toy shop, and to cover their faces with their hands as the doors of the cuckoo clock.
      • Wooden soldiers’ eyes are closed as they stand “on the shelf,” but standing on the floor.
      • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
      • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
      • Verse: Wooden soldiers’ eyes open on 12 as they come to life, ready to march with straight legs and arms around the room. They walk like toy wooden soldiers to the beat while the girls sing the wooden soldier verse and then cuckoo twelve times on beats 1 and 3. The wooden soldiers need to be back at their assigned place by the 12th cuckoo.

    In the Toy Shop

    Chorus: Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, (12 Xs)

    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

    Verse 1:

               d         s       s           s           s       s          s        s   (all quarter notes)

    Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.

                     d      r         m       f           s     f     m    r      d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

                    All the clocks are striking in the town.

                       d         s       s          s       s         s      s        s   (all quarter notes)

                     Out they come the wooden soldiers

    d              r         m             f     s       f        m     r        d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

                     Marching through the toy shop up and down.

     

                     1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

      • The boys become the cuckoo clocks (stand on chairs) and the girls, ballerina dolls. Girls close their eyes as they stand “on the shelf.”
      • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
      • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
      • Verse: The boys chant count to 12; the girls come to life as ballerina dolls while the boys sing the verse, and cuckoo 12 times. The girls need to be back at their assigned places by 12.

    Verse 2:

    Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.
    All the clocks are striking in the town.

    Out they come the ballerinas
    Dancing through the toy shop, all around.

    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

  • Girls back at their places by the twelfth cuckoo, where they join the boys in becoming cuckoo clocks for the ending. All cuckoo 12 times on beats 1 and 3.

Add instruments:

Add students on instruments and create a whole lesson built on this song.

    • The quarter note “tick tock” is easy for students to play on woodblocks.
    • The melody is easy to play on pitched instruments.

Step 6.”Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson – Active Listening and Form

(See December Video 1, 1st grade)

  • Teach the hand jive:
    • Pat 2xs
    • Clap 2xs
    • Palms move over/under each other 2xs; switch places, do again 2xs
    • Fist taps the other fist 2xs; switch places and do again 2xs
    • Left thumb over shoulder 2xs; right thumb over shoulder 2xs
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive
  • C section: crescendo tap eighth notes on both thighs ending with a clap.
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive. (end with a clap and jazz hand explosion in the air)
  • Coda: pat left, pat right, clap.

Step 7. Explore the piano. (If feasible and time allows.)

Transition for leaving: Note name review.

Step 8. Review bass clef and treble clef note names by story place or character.

  • Spend a few seconds asking students to identify note names from Treble Clef Island, using both sets.
  • Then review both sets of cards, beginning with the Thump in the Night story, then guiding through the Secret of Crater Island story cards.
  • Ask if they remember Freddie’s scary dream. Review with the Bass Clef flashcards.
  • Ask students to drop hands and turn in direction of the line.
  • Follow the leader to the door to give Freddie a hug/high five and return to their classroom.

Follow Up Activities:
Next music class: holiday songs and concept review


Resources and References:

  • “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson recording. Youtube recording: http://youtu.be/vwHEqx_3BYE
  • December Video 1 located at TeachingwithFreddieTheFrog.com>Watch & Teach Videos

NOTE: Common Core State Standard codes included on digital download of lesson plan when applicable. (LilyPad Lifeline members only.)


Lesson Plan

Grade 1


Room Set-up/Environment:
Half circle of chairs, open space for movement in the middle.

Materials Needed:

  1. Freddie the Frog teacher’s puppet
  2. Words displayed: accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, presto
  3. Stair-step xylophone if available
  4. Visual display: horse-drawn sleigh
  5. Two-tone wood blocks or single-tone wood blocks
  6. Pitched barred instruments: Xylophones, glockenspiels, etc.
  7. Visual display: form for “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson
  8. Bass Clef Monster and Treble Clef flashcards: Thump in the Night and Secret of Crater Island sets

Student “I can” statements:

  1. I can find my assigned place in the music classroom.
  2. I can identify and move to the beat of varying tempos and meter.
  3. I can identify, play, chant, and sing on beats one and three.
  4. I can sing music expressively, with varying tempo and dynamics.
  5. I can identify accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, and presto; crescendo
  6. I can identify, sing, and play step-wise and repeating patterns.
  7. I can play an ostinato.
  8. I can count to twelve.
  9. I can identify twelve treble clef note names (B below middle C up through line F) and nine bass clef notes.
  10. I can identify and understand the basic functions of a piano.

Process:

Step 1. Silently point, asking students to find their assigned place to sing Freddie’s song in a two-part round.

Step 2. Wait for students to “do their job” so they can sing to Freddie the Frog.

Transition: Tempo game to introduce accelerando. (See December Video 1 for 1st Grade.)

  • Say, “Accelerando!”
  • Followed by saying, “largo”; then, “andante”; then, “allegro”; then, “presto.”
  • Allow time for students to move to each tempo before saying the next one.
  • Say, “Fine!” (Students stop.)
  • Explain that they just did an “accelerando” and what it means.
  • Ask the students what order it needs to be in to move to an accelerando.
  • Repeat the movement to accelerando.
  • “Andante to your seat.”

Step 3. “Welcome, Friends” (traditional round)

(See December Video 1 to hear the song and watch the demonstration.)

    • Demonstrate on stair-step xylophone or other pitched barred instrument.
    • Play a quarter note ostinato on C while teaching the first line of the song.
    • Play the melody on the second line of the song.
    • Teach one line at a time by rote; echo singing.
    • Require tuneful singing by asking students to listen, think, and then sing. Repeat until they do all three, then move on to the next line.

 

Welcome, Friends (meter in 3; 6/8 time signature)

Verse 1:

s          m           s              d1  t      l         s

Welcome, Friends. Be of good cheer.

d      r    m    m     f      s     s         l     t     d

This is the hap-pi-est time of the year.

Verse 2:

s      m    s       d1    t     l       s

 One for all,   all—   for   one.

d        r    m    m      f         s         s      l     t     d

 Sing all to- ge-ther, come join in the fun.

  • Add C boomwhackers, or other pitched instrument, to play a quarter note ostinato on C.
  • Add melody on bells or pitched barred instruments.
  • Ask students to identify the melodic pattern played. (1 2 3 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 or d r m m f s s l t d )
  • If time allows, give students an opportunity to play the ostinato and the melody, or save for a future lesson.

Transition: Ask students to return instruments as directed.

Step 4. “Jingle Bells”

    • Show students a visual of a horse-drawn sleigh. Preferably an image from the late 1800″s when horse-drawn sleighs were used for transportation. Briefly ask questions about why the students think this type of transportation was used.
    • Discuss that automobiles were not invented yet.
    • The purpose and meaning of “bobtails.” (Braided and wrapped in a bun to keep the ice and snow from getting in the horse’s tail.)
    • The purpose of bells on horse’s strapping. (Sleighs on snow are quiet. The jingling of the bells warned pedestrians and others of their arrival.)

Teach the verse to “Jingle Bells,”” pointing to the corresponding parts in the visual, such as “one-horse open sleigh,” and “bells on bobtails.”

Jingle Bells

Verse:

Dashing through the snow
In a one-horse open sleigh.
Over the fields we go
Laughing all the way.
Bells on bobtails ring
Making spirits bright.
What fun it is to ride and sing
Our sleighing song tonight.
Oh…

Chorus:
Jingle bells, jingle bells.
Jingle all the way.
Oh, what fun it is ride
In a one-horse open sleigh.
Hey! (Repeat chorus.)

  • Direct students to keep the beat with body percussion or jingle bells as they sing.

Transition: Return instruments to assigned locations.
Draw or display boxes (representing measures).
Ask students to chant, then count. (See December Video 1, 1st Grade.)

Step 5. “In the Toy Shop” (traditional)

NOTE: Kids LOVE this! Also works well as a performance piece.
(Simple costume performance note: Add ribbon suspenders attached to boys clothing with safety pins: tutus made out of netting with ribbon to tie it around the waist.)

There are several variations. The simplest is to have the students stand still at their assigned places, as though they are toys in a toy shop–boys pre-tend to be wooden soldiers; girls, cuckoo clocks (the “clocks” stand on their chairs, if feasible and safe). In a room with window light, turn off the lights to emulate a toy shop in the middle of the night.

Set the song up with a story. I’m the toy shop owner who is very tired. It is in the middle of the holiday season and I have worked long hours. I walk over to the light switch to turnoff the lights and go home. BUT, what the toy shop owner does not know, is that at the stroke of midnight the toys come to life for one hour.

    • Direct the girls to stand on their chairs as though they are the cuckoo clocks hanging on the walls of the toy shop, and to cover their faces with their hands as the doors of the cuckoo clock.
    • Wooden soldiers’ eyes are closed as they stand “on the shelf,” but standing on the floor.
    • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
    • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
    • Verse: Wooden soldiers’ eyes open on 12 as they come to life, ready to march with straight legs and arms around the room. They walk like toy wooden soldiers to the beat while the girls sing the wooden soldier verse and then cuckoo twelve times on beats 1 and 3. The wooden soldiers need to be back at their assigned place by the 12th cuckoo.

In the Toy Shop

Chorus: Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, (12 Xs)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

Verse 1:

           d         s       s           s           s       s          s        s   (all quarter notes)

Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.

                 d      r         m       f           s     f     m    r      d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

               All the clocks are striking in the town.

                   d         s       s          s       s         s      s        s   (all quarter notes)

                 Out they come the wooden soldiers

d              r         m             f     s       f        m     r        d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

                 Marching through the toy shop up and down.

 

                 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

    • The boys become the cuckoo clocks (stand on chairs) and the girls, ballerina dolls. Girls close their eyes as they stand “on the shelf.”
    • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
    • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
    • Verse: The boys chant count to 12; the girls come to life as ballerina dolls while the boys sing the verse, and cuckoo 12 times. The girls need to be back at their assigned places by 12.

Verse 2:

Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.
All the clocks are striking in the town.

Out they come the ballerinas
Dancing through the toy shop, all around.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

    • Girls back at their places by the twelfth cuckoo, where they join the boys in becoming cuckoo clocks for the ending. All cuckoo 12 times on beats 1 and 3.

Add instruments:

Add students on instruments and create a whole lesson built on this song.

    • The quarter note “tick tock” is easy for students to play on woodblocks.
    • The melody is easy to play on pitched instruments.

Step 6.”Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson – Active Listening and Form

(See December Video 1, 1st grade)

  • Teach the hand jive:
    • Pat 2xs
    • Clap 2xs
    • Palms move over/under each other 2xs; switch places, do again 2xs
    • Fist taps the other fist 2xs; switch places and do again 2xs
    • Left thumb over shoulder 2xs; right thumb over shoulder 2xs
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive
  • C section: crescendo tap eighth notes on both thighs ending with a clap.
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive. (end with a clap and jazz hand explosion in the air)
  • Coda: pat left, pat right, clap.

Step 7. Explore the piano. (If feasible and time allows.)

Transition for leaving: Note name review.

Step 8. Review bass clef and treble clef note names by story place or character.

  • Spend a few seconds asking students to identify note names from Treble Clef Island, using both sets.
  • Then review both sets of cards, beginning with the Thump in the Night story, then guiding through the Secret of Crater Island story cards.
  • Ask if they remember Freddie’s scary dream. Review with the Bass Clef flashcards.
  • Ask students to drop hands and turn in direction of the line.
  • Follow the leader to the door to give Freddie a hug/high five and return to their classroom.

Follow Up Activities:
Next music class: holiday songs and concept review


Resources and References:

  • “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson recording. Youtube recording: http://youtu.be/vwHEqx_3BYE
  • December Video 1 located at TeachingwithFreddieTheFrog.com>Watch & Teach Videos

NOTE: Common Core State Standard codes included on digital download of lesson plan when applicable. (LilyPad Lifeline members only.)


Lesson Plan

Grade 2


Same as Grade 1 with following exception for Step 2:


Step 2. Meet Freddie the Frog. Teach and sing his song, sung as a 3-part round.

Continue with steps as shared in Grade 1.

Room Set-up/Environment:
Half circle of chairs, open space for movement in the middle.

Materials Needed:

  1. Freddie the Frog teacher’s puppet
  2. Words displayed: accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, presto
  3. Stair-step xylophone if available
  4. Visual display: horse-drawn sleigh
  5. Two-tone wood blocks or single-tone wood blocks
  6. Pitched barred instruments: Xylophones, glockenspiels, etc.
  7. Visual display: form for “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson
  8. Bass Clef Monster and Treble Clef flashcards: Thump in the Night and Secret of Crater Island sets

Student “I can” statements:

  1. I can find my assigned place in the music classroom.
  2. I can identify and move to the beat of varying tempos and meter.
  3. I can identify, play, chant, and sing on beats one and three.
  4. I can sing music expressively, with varying tempo and dynamics.
  5. I can identify accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, and presto; crescendo
  6. I can identify, sing, and play step-wise and repeating patterns.
  7. I can play an ostinato.
  8. I can count to twelve.
  9. I can identify twelve treble clef note names (B below middle C up through line F) and nine bass clef notes.
  10. I can identify and understand the basic functions of a piano.

Process:

Step 1. Silently point, asking students to find their assigned place to sing Freddie’s song in a two-part round.

Step 2. Wait for students to “do their job” so they can sing to Freddie the Frog.

Transition: Tempo game to introduce accelerando. (See December Video 1 for 1st Grade.)

  • Say, “Accelerando!”
  • Followed by saying, “largo”; then, “andante”; then, “allegro”; then, “presto.”
  • Allow time for students to move to each tempo before saying the next one.
  • Say, “Fine!” (Students stop.)
  • Explain that they just did an “accelerando” and what it means.
  • Ask the students what order it needs to be in to move to an accelerando.
  • Repeat the movement to accelerando.
  • “Andante to your seat.”

Step 3. “Welcome, Friends” (traditional round)

(See December Video 1 to hear the song and watch the demonstration.)

    • Demonstrate on stair-step xylophone or other pitched barred instrument.
    • Play a quarter note ostinato on C while teaching the first line of the song.
    • Play the melody on the second line of the song.
    • Teach one line at a time by rote; echo singing.
    • Require tuneful singing by asking students to listen, think, and then sing. Repeat until they do all three, then move on to the next line.

Welcome, Friends  (meter in 3; 6/8 time signature)

Verse 1:

s          m           s              d1  t      l         s

Welcome, Friends. Be of good cheer.

d      r    m    m     f      s     s         l     t     d

This is the hap-pi-est time of the year.

Verse 2:

s      m    s       d1    t     l       s

 One for all,   all—   for   one.

d        r    m    m      f         s         s      l     t     d

 Sing all to- ge-ther, come join in the fun.

  • Add C boomwhackers, or other pitched instrument, to play a quarter note ostinato on C.
  • Add melody on bells or pitched barred instruments.
  • Ask students to identify the melodic pattern played. (1 2 3 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 or d r m m f s s l t d )
  • If time allows, give students an opportunity to play the ostinato and the melody, or save for a future lesson.

Transition: Ask students to return instruments as directed.

Step 4. “Jingle Bells”

    • Show students a visual of a horse-drawn sleigh. Preferably an image from the late 1800″s when horse-drawn sleighs were used for transportation. Briefly ask questions about why the students think this type of transportation was used.
    • Discuss that automobiles were not invented yet.
    • The purpose and meaning of “bobtails.” (Braided and wrapped in a bun to keep the ice and snow from getting in the horse’s tail.)
    • The purpose of bells on horse’s strapping. (Sleighs on snow are quiet. The jingling of the bells warned pedestrians and others of their arrival.)

Teach the verse to “Jingle Bells,”” pointing to the corresponding parts in the visual, such as “one-horse open sleigh,” and “bells on bobtails.”

Jingle Bells

Verse:

Dashing through the snow
In a one-horse open sleigh.
Over the fields we go
Laughing all the way.
Bells on bobtails ring
Making spirits bright.
What fun it is to ride and sing
Our sleighing song tonight.
Oh…

Chorus:
Jingle bells, jingle bells.
Jingle all the way.
Oh, what fun it is ride
In a one-horse open sleigh.
Hey! (Repeat chorus.)

  • Direct students to keep the beat with body percussion or jingle bells as they sing.

Transition: Return instruments to assigned locations.
Draw or display boxes (representing measures).
Ask students to chant, then count. (See December Video 1, 1st Grade.)

Step 5. “In the Toy Shop” (traditional)

NOTE: Kids LOVE this! Also works well as a performance piece.
(Simple costume performance note: Add ribbon suspenders attached to boys clothing with safety pins: tutus made out of netting with ribbon to tie it around the waist.)

There are several variations. The simplest is to have the students stand still at their assigned places, as though they are toys in a toy shop–boys pre-tend to be wooden soldiers; girls, cuckoo clocks (the “clocks” stand on their chairs, if feasible and safe). In a room with window light, turn off the lights to emulate a toy shop in the middle of the night.

Set the song up with a story. I’m the toy shop owner who is very tired. It is in the middle of the holiday season and I have worked long hours. I walk over to the light switch to turnoff the lights and go home. BUT, what the toy shop owner does not know, is that at the stroke of midnight the toys come to life for one hour.

    • Direct the girls to stand on their chairs as though they are the cuckoo clocks hanging on the walls of the toy shop, and to cover their faces with their hands as the doors of the cuckoo clock.
    • Wooden soldiers’ eyes are closed as they stand “on the shelf,” but standing on the floor.
    • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
    • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
    • Verse: Wooden soldiers’ eyes open on 12 as they come to life, ready to march with straight legs and arms around the room. They walk like toy wooden soldiers to the beat while the girls sing the wooden soldier verse and then cuckoo twelve times on beats 1 and 3. The wooden soldiers need to be back at their assigned place by the 12th cuckoo.

In the Toy Shop

Chorus: Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, (12 Xs)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

Verse 1:

           d         s       s           s           s       s          s        s   (all quarter notes)

Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.

                 d      r         m       f           s     f     m    r      d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

                All the clocks are striking in the town.

                   d         s       s          s       s         s      s        s   (all quarter notes)

                 Out they come the wooden soldiers

d              r         m             f     s       f        m     r        d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

                 Marching through the toy shop up and down.

 

                 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

    • The boys become the cuckoo clocks (stand on chairs) and the girls, ballerina dolls. Girls close their eyes as they stand “on the shelf.”
    • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
    • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
    • Verse: The boys chant count to 12; the girls come to life as ballerina dolls while the boys sing the verse, and cuckoo 12 times. The girls need to be back at their assigned places by 12.

Verse 2:

Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.
All the clocks are striking in the town.

Out they come the ballerinas
Dancing through the toy shop, all around.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

Add instruments:

Add students on instruments and create a whole lesson built on this song.

    • The quarter note “tick tock” is easy for students to play on woodblocks.
    • The melody is easy to play on pitched instruments.

Step 6.”Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson – Active Listening and Form

(See December Video 1, 1st grade)

  • Teach the hand jive:
    • Pat 2xs
    • Clap 2xs
    • Palms move over/under each other 2xs; switch places, do again 2xs
    • Fist taps the other fist 2xs; switch places and do again 2xs
    • Left thumb over shoulder 2xs; right thumb over shoulder 2xs
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive
  • C section: crescendo tap eighth notes on both thighs ending with a clap.
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive. (end with a clap and jazz hand explosion in the air)
  • Coda: pat left, pat right, clap.

Step 7. Explore the piano. (If feasible and time allows.)

Transition for leaving: Note name review.

Step 8. Review bass clef and treble clef note names by story place or character.

  • Spend a few seconds asking students to identify note names from Treble Clef Island, using both sets.
  • Then review both sets of cards, beginning with the Thump in the Night story, then guiding through the Secret of Crater Island story cards.
  • Ask if they remember Freddie’s scary dream. Review with the Bass Clef flashcards.
  • Ask students to drop hands and turn in direction of the line.
  • Follow the leader to the door to give Freddie a hug/high five and return to their classroom.

Follow Up Activities:
Next music class: holiday songs and concept review


Resources and References:

  • “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson recording. Youtube recording: http://youtu.be/vwHEqx_3BYE
  • December Video 1 located at TeachingwithFreddieTheFrog.com>Watch & Teach Videos

NOTE: Common Core State Standard codes included on digital download of lesson plan when applicable. (LilyPad Lifeline members only.)


Lesson Plan

Grade 3


Same as Grade  2 with the exception of replacing Step 5 as shown below.

Room Set-up/Environment:
Half circle of chairs, open space for movement in the middle.

Materials Needed:

  1. Freddie the Frog teacher’s puppet
  2. Words displayed: accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, presto
  3. Stair-step xylophone if available
  4. Visual display: horse-drawn sleigh
  5. Two-tone wood blocks or single-tone wood blocks
  6. Pitched barred instruments: Xylophones, glockenspiels, etc.
  7. Visual display: form for “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson
  8. Bass Clef Monster and Treble Clef flashcards: Thump in the Night and Secret of Crater Island sets

Student “I can” statements:

  1. I can find my assigned place in the music classroom.
  2. I can identify and move to the beat of varying tempos and meter.
  3. I can identify, play, chant, and sing on beats one and three.
  4. I can sing music expressively, with varying tempo and dynamics.
  5. I can identify accelerando, largo, andante, allegro, and presto; crescendo
  6. I can identify, sing, and play step-wise and repeating patterns.
  7. I can play an ostinato.
  8. I can count to twelve.
  9. I can identify twelve treble clef note names (B below middle C up through line F) and nine bass clef notes.
  10. I can identify and understand the basic functions of a piano.

Process:

Step 1. Silently point, asking students to find their assigned place to sing Freddie’s song in a two-part round.

Step 2. Wait for students to “do their job” so they can sing to Freddie the Frog.

Transition: Tempo game to introduce accelerando. (See December Video 1 for 1st Grade.)

  • Say, “Accelerando!”
  • Followed by saying, “largo”; then, “andante”; then, “allegro”; then, “presto.”
  • Allow time for students to move to each tempo before saying the next one.
  • Say, “Fine!” (Students stop.)
  • Explain that they just did an “accelerando” and what it means.
  • Ask the students what order it needs to be in to move to an accelerando.
  • Repeat the movement to accelerando.
  • “Andante to your seat.”

Step 3. “Welcome, Friends” (traditional round)

(See December Video 1 to hear the song and watch the demonstration.)

    • Demonstrate on stair-step xylophone or other pitched barred instrument.
    • Play a quarter note ostinato on C while teaching the first line of the song.
    • Play the melody on the second line of the song.
    • Teach one line at a time by rote; echo singing.
    • Require tuneful singing by asking students to listen, think, and then sing. Repeat until they do all three, then move on to the next line.
  • Welcome, Friends (meter in 3; 6/8 time signature)

    Verse 1:

     s          m           s              d1  t      l         s

    Welcome, Friends. Be of good cheer.

       d      r    m    m     f      s     s         l     t     d

    This is the hap-pi-est time of the year.

    Verse 2:

         s      m    s       d1    t     l       s

     One for all,   all—   for   one.

       d        r    m    m      f         s         s      l     t     d

     Sing all to- ge-ther, come join in the fun.

    • Add C boomwhackers, or other pitched instrument, to play a quarter note ostinato on C.
    • Add melody on bells or pitched barred instruments.
    • Ask students to identify the melodic pattern played. (1 2 3 3 4 5 5 6 7 8 or d r m m f s s l t d )
    • If time allows, give students an opportunity to play the ostinato and the melody, or save for a future lesson.

    Transition: Ask students to return instruments as directed.

    Step 4. “Jingle Bells”

      • Show students a visual of a horse-drawn sleigh. Preferably an image from the late 1800″s when horse-drawn sleighs were used for transportation. Briefly ask questions about why the students think this type of transportation was used.
      • Discuss that automobiles were not invented yet.
      • The purpose and meaning of “bobtails.” (Braided and wrapped in a bun to keep the ice and snow from getting in the horse’s tail.)
      • The purpose of bells on horse’s strapping. (Sleighs on snow are quiet. The jingling of the bells warned pedestrians and others of their arrival.)

    Teach the verse to “Jingle Bells,”” pointing to the corresponding parts in the visual, such as “one-horse open sleigh,” and “bells on bobtails.”

    Jingle Bells

    Verse:

    Dashing through the snow
    In a one-horse open sleigh.
    Over the fields we go
    Laughing all the way.
    Bells on bobtails ring
    Making spirits bright.
    What fun it is to ride and sing
    Our sleighing song tonight.
    Oh…

    Chorus:
    Jingle bells, jingle bells.
    Jingle all the way.
    Oh, what fun it is ride
    In a one-horse open sleigh.
    Hey! (Repeat chorus.)

    • Direct students to keep the beat with body percussion or jingle bells as they sing.

    Transition: Return instruments to assigned locations.
    Draw or display boxes (representing measures).
    Ask students to chant, then count. (See December Video 1, 1st Grade.)

    Step 5. “In the Toy Shop” (traditional)

    NOTE: Kids LOVE this! Also works well as a performance piece.
    (Simple costume performance note: Add ribbon suspenders attached to boys clothing with safety pins: tutus made out of netting with ribbon to tie it around the waist.)

    There are several variations. The simplest is to have the students stand still at their assigned places, as though they are toys in a toy shop–boys pre-tend to be wooden soldiers; girls, cuckoo clocks (the “clocks” stand on their chairs, if feasible and safe). In a room with window light, turn off the lights to emulate a toy shop in the middle of the night.

    Set the song up with a story. I’m the toy shop owner who is very tired. It is in the middle of the holiday season and I have worked long hours. I walk over to the light switch to turnoff the lights and go home. BUT, what the toy shop owner does not know, is that at the stroke of midnight the toys come to life for one hour.

      • Direct the girls to stand on their chairs as though they are the cuckoo clocks hanging on the walls of the toy shop, and to cover their faces with their hands as the doors of the cuckoo clock.
      • Wooden soldiers’ eyes are closed as they stand “on the shelf,” but standing on the floor.
      • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
      • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
      • Verse: Wooden soldiers’ eyes open on 12 as they come to life, ready to march with straight legs and arms around the room. They walk like toy wooden soldiers to the beat while the girls sing the wooden soldier verse and then cuckoo twelve times on beats 1 and 3. The wooden soldiers need to be back at their assigned place by the 12th cuckoo.

    In the Toy Shop

    Chorus: Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, (12 Xs)

                1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

                   Verse 1:

               d         s       s           s           s       s          s        s   (all quarter notes)

    Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.

                     d      r         m       f           s     f     m    r      d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

                    All the clocks are striking in the town.

                       d         s       s          s       s         s      s        s   (all quarter notes)

                     Out they come the wooden soldiers

                       d              r         m             f     s       f        m     r        d (four eighth notes; five quarter notes; rest)

                     Marching through the toy shop up and down.

     

                     1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12 , midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

      • The boys become the cuckoo clocks (stand on chairs) and the girls, ballerina dolls. Girls close their eyes as they stand “on the shelf.”
      • Six-measure cuckoo: Play the wood block or tempo block on quarter note beats to represent the ticking of a clock. Cuckoo clocks open and close their hands placed on the faces as though they are the bird on the cuckoo clock. Each time their hands open they say “cuckoo” in their head voice, on beats 1 and 3 for six measures, totaling 12 cuckoos.
      • Six-measure count: Cuckoo clocks place both arms straight above their heads as though they are the arms of a clock at 12am. Right arm stays up while the left arm moves around the clock clockwise while chanting the corresponding numbers, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, on the half note, beats 1 and 3. Sing, “midnight, midnight.” (all on “do”)
      • Verse: The boys chant count to 12; the girls come to life as ballerina dolls while the boys sing the verse, and cuckoo 12 times. The girls need to be back at their assigned places by 12.

    Verse 2:

    Midnight, midnight, bells are sounding.
    All the clocks are striking in the town.

    Out they come the ballerinas
    Dancing through the toy shop, all around.

    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 10, 11, 12, midnight, midnight. (all sung on “do”)

    Girls back at their places by the twelfth cuckoo, where they join the boys in becoming cuckoo clocks for the ending. All cuckoo 12 times on beats 1 and 3.

Add instruments:

Add students on instruments and create a whole lesson built on this song.

    • The quarter note “tick tock” is easy for students to play on woodblocks.
    • The melody is easy to play on pitched instruments.

Step 6.”Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson – Active Listening and Form

(See December Video 1, 1st grade)

  • Teach the hand jive:
    • Pat 2xs
    • Clap 2xs
    • Palms move over/under each other 2xs; switch places, do again 2xs
    • Fist taps the other fist 2xs; switch places and do again 2xs
    • Left thumb over shoulder 2xs; right thumb over shoulder 2xs
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive
  • C section: crescendo tap eighth notes on both thighs ending with a clap.
  • A section: hand jive.
  • B section: tap one thigh with both hands on eighth notes, then clap; repeat on the right side.
  • A section: hand jive. (end with a clap and jazz hand explosion in the air)
  • Coda: pat left, pat right, clap.

Step 7. Explore the piano. (If feasible and time allows.)

Transition for leaving: Note name review.

Step 8. Review bass clef and treble clef note names by story place or character.

  • Spend a few seconds asking students to identify note names from Treble Clef Island, using both sets.
  • Then review both sets of cards, beginning with the Thump in the Night story, then guiding through the Secret of Crater Island story cards.
  • Ask if they remember Freddie’s scary dream. Review with the Bass Clef flashcards.
  • Ask students to drop hands and turn in direction of the line.
  • Follow the leader to the door to give Freddie a hug/high five and return to their classroom.

Follow Up Activities:
Next music class: holiday songs and concept review


Resources and References:

  • “Sleigh Ride” by Leroy Anderson recording. Youtube recording: http://youtu.be/vwHEqx_3BYE
  • December Video 1 located at TeachingwithFreddieTheFrog.com>Watch & Teach Videos

NOTE: Common Core State Standard codes included on digital download of lesson plan when applicable. (LilyPad Lifeline members only.)